Month: February 2017

Tech Terms: Programmatic Advertising

Usually referred to as programmatic marketing or ads, programmatic advertising is a way to leverage an algorithmic-based purchase and sale of digital advertising to target specific audiences, such as segments across age, gender, social or geographic locations.
Programmatic advertising buyers basically set key parameters such as bid price, reach, specific audience data, platform and dozens of other variables to achieve the desired ROI per campaign. Buyers are algorithmically matched with inventory.

Buying and Display
Programmatic media buying uses software to automate the buying and placement of media inventory using a bidding system. Programmatic advertising buyers set key parameters such as bid price, reach, specific audience data, platform and dozens of other variables. Advertisers can also tailor messages based on the expected audience and context to achieve the desired ROI per campaign. For publishers, the ads are displayed on a site based on demographic information about the current on-site user and matching ads are displayed to the user in real-time.

Programmatic advertising technology allows all standard ad tasks such as purchasing, bidding, negations and ad insertions to all be automated and completed by software and machines, without any human interaction. It is widely accepted that programmatic media buying creates a more efficient and overall cheaper advertising system.
Native Programmatic Advertising
Standard and traditional website banner ads simply do not fit today’s mobile screens. As more advertisers adopt programmatic advertising, there is a need for programmatic native ads that will fit the ad space on mobile devices and perform well within new types of publisher content that is designed for mobile users. When creating programmatic native ads there is a need to consider using different images or headlines and to better track native ad performance alongside other programmatic advertising campaigns.

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Tech Terms: Software Licensing

Allowing an individual or group to use a piece of software. Nearly all applications are licensed rather than sold. There are a variety of different types of software licenses. Some are based on the number machines on which the licensed program can run whereas others are based on the number of users that can use the program. Most personal computer software licenses allow you to run the program on only one machine and to make copies of the software only for backup purposes. Some licenses also allow you to run the program on different computers as long as you don’t use the copies simultaneously.

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Tech Terms: Software

Software means computer instructions or data. Anything that can be stored electronically is software, in contrast to storage devices and display devices which are called hardware.

The Difference Between Software and Hardware

The terms software and hardware are used as both nouns and adjectives. For example, you can say: “The problem lies in the software,” meaning that there is a problem with the program or data, not with the computer itself. You can also say: “It is a software problem.”
The distinction between software and hardware is sometimes confusing because they are so integrally linked. Clearly, when you purchase a program, you are buying software. But to buy the software, you need to buy the disk (hardware) on which the software is recorded.

Categories of Computer Software

Software is often divided into two categories. Systems software includes the operating system and all the utilities that enable the computer to function. Applications software includes programs that do real work for users. For example, word processors, spreadsheets, and database management systems fall under the category of applications software.

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Tech Terms: Web Services

The term Web services describes a standardized way of integrating Web-based applications using the XML, SOAP, WSDL and UDDI open standards over an Internet protocol backbone. XML is used to tag the data, SOAP is used to transfer the data, WSDL is used for describing the services available and UDDI is used for listing what services are available. Used primarily as a means for businesses to communicate with each other and with clients, Web services allow organizations to communicate data without intimate knowledge of each other’s IT systems behind the firewall.

Unlike traditional client/server models, such as a Web server/Web page system, Web services do not provide the user with a GUI. Web services instead share business logic, data and processes through a programmatic interface across a network. The applications interface, not the users. Developers can then add the Web service to a GUI (such as a Web page or an executable program) to offer specific functionality to users.
Web services allow different applications from different sources to communicate with each other without time-consuming custom coding, and because all communication is in XML, Web services are not tied to any one operating system or programming language. For example, Java can talk with Perl, Windows applications can talk with UNIX applications.

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Tech Terms: Data Center Container

Also called a modular data center or data center-in-a-box. A data center container is a method of deploying data centers that is designed to add data center capacity and to reduce an organization’s cooling and power consumption costs. The container refers to a modular, portable self-contained environment that can be shipped and deployed. The container is portable, so it can be relocated or deployed in non-traditional data centers, such as urban spaces. A data center container is also faster to deploy than a traditional data center.

Examples of a Data Center Container

An example of a container is HP’s Performance Optimized Datacenters (PODs). It is a 40-foot shipping container with up to 22 racks of servers inside, pre-installed and ready to go. Container data centers have become popularized by vendors like Sun Microsystems and Rackable Systems and are considered to be a part of the modern data center.

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Tech Terms: Data Center Tiers

A four tier system that provides a simple and effective means for identifying different data center site infrastructure design topologies. The Uptime Institute’s tiered classification system is an industry standard approach to site infrastructure functionality addresses common benchmarking standard needs. The four tiers, as classified by The Uptime Institute include the following:

  • Tier 1: composed of a single path for power and cooling distribution, without redundant components, providing 99.671% availability.
  • Tier II: composed of a single path for power and cooling distribution, with redundant components, providing 99.741% availability
  • Tier III: composed of multiple active power and cooling distribution paths, but only one path active, has redundant components, and is concurrently maintainable, providing 99.982% availability
  • Tier IV: composed of multiple active power and cooling distribution paths, has redundant components, and is fault tolerant, providing 99.995% availability.

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Tech Terms: Web Morality

A phrase used to describe how people use morals to guide choices while surfing the Web and using the Internet.

One popular Web morality issue that is often debated is the practice of visiting Web sites while using an ad blocker program. Many sites rely on advertisement revenue and some believe it is morally wrong to surf and intentionally block ads as you are taking advantage of what the Web sitehas to offer without viewing the ad content.

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Tech Terms: Data Center Management

Data center management refers to the role of an individual within the data center (data center manager) who is responsible for overseeing technical and IT issues within the data center. This includes computer and server operations, data entry, data security, data quality control and management of the services and applications used for data processing.

Data center management integrates into other IT systems for complete data synchronization including virtual systems, proprietary systems, and automation. Data center management requires a number of tools, IT policies and strategies to create and maintain a secure and efficient data center.

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Tech Terms: Financial Software

Financial software is typically described as any type of computer software designed to help individuals or corporations manage finances and business ledger and other accounting needs.

Financial software can track financial accounts, categorize income and expenses, synchronize transactions with banks and credit card companies, pay bills online, work with budgets, track and analyze investments, create financial and tax-related reports, and provide at-a-glance snapshots of a financial net worth.

Types of Financial Software

Financial software is divided into two categories: financial management (money management) and tax software. Financial management software typically provides the tools to manage banking, income flow, investing and planning. Tax software provides importing tools, tax form preparation and e-filing of your taxes.

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Tech Terms: Tax Software

Tax software is defined as a type of computer software designed to help individuals or companies prepare for and file income, corporate and similar tax returns. Tax software streamlines the process of filing taxes by walking the user through tax forms and issues and also automatically calculates the individual’s or company’s tax obligations. Many personal tax software applications are now available in the traditional physical box software format (retail software) as well as in hosted online service (SaaS) formats.

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