Tech Terms: Apple TV 4K

Apple TV 4K is the latest iteration of the Apple TV digital media receiver device that can play movies from sources like Netflix, TV shows, YouTube and other videos, live sports, and more on a widescreen TV.

Apple TV 4K improves upon earlier Apple TV releases that offered a max of 1920×1080 pixels of detail (high definition) by supporting the ultra-high-definition 3840×2160 picture format. Apple TV 4K adds high dynamic range (4K HDR) support as well as the premium quality Dolby Vision format.

Apple TV 4K is powered by Apple’s tvOS, an operating system originally developed for the Apple TV 4th generation (not to be confused with the Apple TV 4K) and announced on September 9, 2015. tvOS includes support for Siri, which can be accessed by a button on the Siri Remote that comes with the Apple TV 4K to help users quickly and easily find content from a variety of multimedia sources.

Pricing and Competition for the Apple TV 4K
The higher quality and other improvements offered by AppleTV 4K do come at an increased cost. While the original Apple TV device retailed for $99 and the 32GB fourth generation Apple TV remains available for $149, the AppleTV 4K costs $179 with 32GB of storage and $199 with 64GB of storage.

Apple TV 4K is priced considerably higher than competing models like the Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast Ultra and Roku Streaming Stick+, all of which offer 4K HDR support and do so for at least $100 less than the Apple TV 4K.

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Tips & Tricks: iPhone X Home Button Indicator

Without a physical Home button, Apple added a Home indicator at the bottom of the screen. The Home indicator is used for unlocking the device and for activating the app switcher. To activate the app switcher, you have to drag the opened app with your finger from the Home indicator to towards the right of the screen. Then you will see all of the opened apps lined up in order to switch between them easier.

Tech Terms: MIS

MIS is short for management information system or management information services.
Management information system, or MIS, broadly refers to a computer-based system that provides managers with the tools to organize, evaluate and efficiently manage departments within an organization. In order to provide past, present and prediction information, a management information system can include software that helps in decision making, data resources such as databases, the hardware resources of a system, decision support systems, people management and project management applications, and any computerized processes that enable the department to run efficiently.

Management Information System Managers
The role of the management information system (MIS) manager is to focus on the organization’s information and technology systems. The MIS manager typically analyzes business problems and then designs and maintains computer applications to solve the organization’s problems.

Within companies and large organizations, the department responsible for computer systems is sometimes called the MIS department. Other names for MIS include information systems (IS) and information technology (IT).

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Tips & Tricks: iPhone X Apple Pay

When you double-click the side button on the right-hand side of the device, it will open up Apple Pay. This makes it easier for you to pay bills without having to take your debit or credit card out of your wallet.

Tech Terms: two tier enterprise resource planning

Organizations use two-tier enterprise resource planning (ERP) to run two integrated ERP systems simultaneously. One system, the legacy application, also called the the Tier-1 system, is typically deployed at the corporate level and the other is managed at the subsidiary level. Two-tier ERP software is often used by large corporations with multiple sites or by an organization that’s based in multiple geographic locations.

The Benefits of Two-Tier ERP
Two-tier ERP enables an organization to optimize regional back office processes at a site that operates under a business model that is separate from the main company. At some locations the ERP requires special considerations — including translations or regionalized business models — and organizations my look to maintain a legacy ERP at headquarters with two-tier ERP solutions to support specific needs at the subsidiary level that fully integrates with the corporate system.
Master data management is one of the biggest concerns for organizations deploying two tiers of ERP. There should be no duplication of effort between the two ERP systems. Consistency is required at the second tier to ensure the corporate first-tier ERP achieves a single source of information for financials, orders and other business.

When Do Organizations Use Two-Tier ERP?
Often a Two-tier ERP system is implemented when the legacy, Tier-1 system, becomes very large and costly to customize, maintain and upgrade or when mergers and acquisitions leave an organization with multiple ERP solutions that they are unable to consolidate to a single ERP system.

According to EnterpriseAppsToday, the following scenarios are common in organization that use two tiers of ERP:

  • A business with a very specific local focus – single-site or multi-site within a single country or region.
  • A business with operations geared strongly toward a specific industry that doesn’t feature strongly at corporate headquarters.
  • A newly-acquired operation with a mismatch of multiple outdated, unsupported ERPs.
  • A small subsidiary with no formal ERP in place.
  • A small operation at the second-tier which doesn’t warrant the use of enterprise ERP software, but may be brought into the corporate fold as operations grow.

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Tech Terms: ERP

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) is business process management software that allows an organization to use a system of integrated applications to manage the business and automate many back office functions related to technology, services and human resources.
ERP software typically integrates all facets of an operation — including product planning, development, manufacturing, sales and marketing — in a single database, application and user interface.

ERP is an Enterprise Application
ERP software is considered to be a type of enterprise application, that is software designed to be used by larger businesses and often requires dedicated teams to customize and analyze the data and to handle upgrades and deployment. In contrast, Small business ERP applications are lightweight business management software solutions, often customized for a specific business industry or vertical.

Today most organizations implement ERP systems to replace legacy software or to incorporate ERP applications because no system currently exists. In fact, a 2016 study by Panorama Consulting Solutions, LLC., indicates that organizations implement ERP for the following reasons:

  • To replace out-of-date ERP software (49%)
  • To replace homegrown systems (16%)
  • To replace accounting software (15%)
  • To replace other non-ERP systems / had no system (20%)

ERP Software Modules Explained
ERP software typically consists of multiple enterprise software modules that are individually purchased, based on what best meets the specific needs and technical capabilities of the organization. Each ERP module is focused on one area of business processes, such as product development or marketing.

Some of the most common ERP modules include those for product planning, material purchasing, inventory control, distribution, accounting, marketing, finance and HR. A business will typically use a combination of different modules to manage back-office activities and tasks including the following:

  • Distribution process management
  • Supply chain management
  • Services knowledge base
  • Configure prices
  • Improve accuracy of financial data
  • Facilitate better project planning
  • Automate the employee life-cycle
  • Standardize critical business procedures
  • Reduce redundant tasks
  • Assess business needs
  • Accounting and financial applications
  • Lower purchasing costs
  • Manage human resources and payroll

As the ERP methodology has become more popular, software applications have emerged to help business managers implement ERP in to other business activities and may incorporate modules for CRM and business intelligence, presenting it as a single unified package.

The basic goal of using an enterprise resource planning system is to provide one central repository for all information that is shared by all the various ERP facets to improve the flow of data across the organization.

Enterprise ERP Trends
The ERP field can be slow to change, but the last couple of years have unleashed new technology trends which are fundamentally shifting the entire area. The following new and continuing computing trends have an impact on the growth of enterprise ERP software:

  • Mobile ERP: Executives and employees want real-time access to information, regardless of where they are. It is expected that businesses will embrace mobile ERP for the reports, dashboards and to conduct key business processes.
  • Cloud ERP: The cloud has been advancing steadily into the enterprise for some time, but many ERP users have been reluctant to place data cloud. Those reservations have gradually been evaporating, however, as the advantages of the cloud become apparent.
  • Social ERP: There has been much hype around social media and how important —or not — it is to add to ERP systems. Certainly, vendors have been quick to seize the initiative, adding social media packages to their ERP systems with much fanfare. But some wonder if there is really much gain to be had by integrating social media with ERP.
  • Two-tier ERP: Enterprises once attempted to build an all-encompassing ERP system to take care of every aspect of organizational systems. But some expensive failures have gradually brought about a change in strategy – adopting two tiers of ERP.

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Tips & Tricks: Android Control Switches

Switch the buttons on the Quick Settings menu like a boss. All you need to say is ‘Switch on Wi-Fi/Bluetooth’ or ‘Turn the phone silent’ and all these will be done in a split second, without the need for any intervention.

Plus, it can even tell you which Wi-Fi network you’re connected to, make a quick call or open apps and websites with the minimum of effort.

Tech Terms: cloud CRM – Customer Relationship Management cloud

Cloud CRM (or CRM cloud) means any customer relationship management (CRM) technology where the CRM software, CRM tools and the organization’s customer data resides in the cloud and is delivered to end-users via the Internet (see “cloud computing”).

Cloud CRM typically offers access to the application via Web-based tools (or Web browser) logins where the CRM system administrator has previously defined access levels across the organization. Employees can log in to the CRM system, simultaneously, from any Internet-enabled computer or device. Often, cloud CRM provide users with mobile apps to make it easier to use the CRM on smartphones and tablets.

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Tips & Tricks: Android Translations

Google has brought the translations to its smart assistant, and it works like a charm. So the next time you’re looking for the Spanish translation of ‘Good evening’, just let the Assistant know and it’ll show it in the blink of an eye.