Apple

Tech Terms: Facetime

FaceTime is a video telephone / video chat service somewhat similar to Skype and Google Hangouts that makes it possible to conduct one-on-one video calls between newer Apple iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and Mac notebooks and desktops.

FaceTime App Requires AppleID
Apple’s FaceTime service is free to use but does require an Apple ID and a Wi-Fi connection, although future versions of FaceTime may also work over 3G and/or 4G connections, and several apps are currently available that make FaceTime over a 3G connection possible on a jailbroken iPhone.
FaceTime first debuted in the second half of 2010 on the iPhone 4, and currently supports the iPhone 4 and later, iPad 2 and later, the fourth generation iPod touch and later, and Macs with Mac OS X Snow Leopard (v10.6.6) and later installed. Some FaceTime features, like 720p resolution, are only available on certain platforms such as newer MacBook Pros and iMacs.

How to Set Up FaceTime on Your Apple Device

  • From settings tap “FaceTime”
  • Turn on FaceTime and tap “Use Your Apple ID”
  • Enter your Apple ID and password then tap to sign in
  • Verify the log in details then tap “Next”
  • Choose an email address and phone number for incoming and outgoing FaceTime calls

FaceTime Compatibility for Android Devices

FaceTime is incompatible with non-Apple devices as it is a proprietary app and service. For non-Apple users, there exists a number of alternative Android apps including Google Hangouts, ooVoo and Skype.

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Tips & Tricks: How to Take Screenshot on Macbook

Users can take full screen screenshots by selecting Command + Shift + 3 or capture a selection by selecting Command + Shift + 4. Screenshots are saved to the desktop.

Tech Terms: iTunes

iTunes is an audio playback program developed by Apple Computer. You can use iTunes to import songs from CDs as well as other audio files from your hard drive. The program can also download songs (for a small fee) from the iTunes Music Store. While songs are the most common files played by iTunes, you can also play spoken word files, such as audio books or other recordings. iTunes also has a radio option that allows you to play live streams of Internet radio from a variety of stations.

Each file you import with iTunes get stored in the iTunes library. Fortunately, the library can be organized into multiple playlists, which is especially helpful when you have thousands of songs. (Yes, some people have over 10,000 songs in their library.) You can also create “smart playlists,” which store songs according to the parameters you set. For example, if you want a playlist of only rock music, you can create a smart playlist that only holds songs where the “Genre” tag contains “Rock.” iTunes is the software that comes with the iPod, and allows you to transfer your playlists from your computer to your iPod. Like the iPod, iTunes can be used on a Mac or PC.

Source: http://techterms.com/definition/itunes

Tech Terms: iPod

The iPod is a portable music player developed by Apple Computer. Though it is an Apple product, the iPod can be used with both Macs and PCs. The iTunes software, also created by Apple, is used to organize and transfer songs and playlists to the iPod. Both iTunes and the iPod support a wide variety of audio formats, including MP3, AAC, WAV, and AIFF. MP3 is the most common audio compression format, while AAC is the format used by the iTunes Music Store. WAV and AIFF are nearly identical formats that store CD-quality audio.

Since introducing the iPod in 2001, Apple has released several new versions of the popular device. These include iPod, iPod mini, iPod Special Edition, iPod photo, and iPod shuffle. iPod mini is a smaller version of the iPod that comes in various colors and stores fewer songs. iPod Special Edition is a variation of the basic iPod (the first being a black U2 iPod with the signatures of the band members on the back). iPod photo is an iPod with a color screen that allows users to store and view a library of photos as well as play music. iPod shuffle is an extra small iPod that only holds a couple hundred songs and does not have a screen.

All iPods store data on an internal hard drive, except the iPod Shuffle, which uses flash memory. This means each iPod, including the shuffle, can also be used as a hard drive. Aside from being a music player, the iPod can serve as a backup device, a basic organizer, and an alarm clock. To transfer files to the iPod, you must first connect it to your computer using a USB or Firewire cable. iTunes can automatically transfer your playlists and songs or you can change the program’s preferences to manually update the iPod.

Because of its superb interface and unmatched ease of use, the iPod has become the staple product of the portable music player market. Granted, the “cool factor” of owning an iPod has certainly helped it gain popularity as well.

Source: http://techterms.com/definition/ipod

Tech Terms: Macintosh

Macintosh is a line of desktop and laptop computers developed by Apple. Each Macintosh computer, or Mac, runs a version of the Mac OS, Apple’s desktop operating system. Since 2001, all Macs have run Mac OS X, a redesigned version of the original Mac OS that was built from the NeXTSTEP operating system.

The original Macintosh, released in 1984, was the first personal computer to have a graphical user interface, or GUI. It was in all-in-one machine with a color display and included a mouse and a keyboard. Over the past several decades, Apple has released many new types of Macintosh computers, including all-in-one models, system units (which do not include a monitor), and portable computers.

The current Macintosh line (as of early 2012) includes the following models:

Mac Pro – a professional desktop computer sold as a system unit
iMac – an all-in-one desktop computer aimed at home and pro users
Mac mini – a small desktop computer designed for home and server purposes
MacBook Pro – a portable computer aimed towards students and pro users
MacBook Air – a lightweight portable computer designed for travelers
NOTE: While Macs are technically personal computers (PCs), the term PC is often used to describe computers that run Windows or Linux. Therefore, Macs are often referred to as personal computers, but not PCs. Unlike PCs, which are manufactured by several different companies, Apple designs and manufactures all Macintosh computers.

Source: http://techterms.com/definition/macintosh