Tech Terms: Small Business ERP

In ERP (enterprise resource planning) terminology, the phrase small business ERP is used to describe a lightweight business management software that is designed to meet the needs of a small business.
ERP software integrates all facets of an operation, including development, manufacturing, sales and marketing. Small business ERP is typically a SaaS (software as a service) model and includes project management, financials, manufacturing, warehouse management, accounting, sales and business management.

Typically, ERP software is considered an enterprise application and designed for larger enterprises that require dedicated teams to customize, analyze the data and reports and handle upgrades and deployment. In contrast, Small business ERP applications differ in a number of ways including the amount of data handled by the system and less-complex screens and dashboards. Support is offered by the provider and the software is customized for the business industry you work in.

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Tech Terms: ERP

In software a module is a part of a program, and programs are composed of one or more independently developed modules that are not combined until the program is linked.

ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) software typically consists of multiple enterprise software modules that are individually purchased, based on what best meets the specific needs and technical capabilities of the organization.

Each ERP module is focused on one area of business processes, such as product development or marketing. Some of the more common ERP modules include those for product planning, material purchasing, inventory control, distribution, accounting, marketing, finance and HR.

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Tech Terms: Big Data

Big Data is a phrase used to mean a massive volume of both structured and unstructured data that is so large it is difficult to process using traditional database and software techniques. In most enterprise scenarios the volume of data is too big or it moves too fast or it exceeds current processing capacity.
Big Data has the potential to help companies improve operations and make faster, more intelligent decisions. The data is collected from a number of sources including emails, mobile devices, applications, databases, servers and other means. This data, when captured, formatted, manipulated, stored and then analyzed, can help a company to gain useful insight to increase revenues, get or retain customers and improve operations.

Is Big Data a Volume or a Technology?
While the term may seem to reference the volume of data, that isn’t always the case. The term Big Data, especially when used by vendors, may refer to the technology (which includes tools and processes) that an organization requires to handle the large amounts of data and storage facilities. The term is believed to have originated with web search companies who needed to query very large distributed aggregations of loosely-structured data.

An Example of Big Data
An example of Big Data might be petabytes (1,024 terabytes) or exabytes (1,024 petabytes) of data consisting of billions to trillions of records of millions of people—all from different sources (e.g. Web, sales, customer contact center, social media, mobile data and so on). The data is typically loosely structured data that is often incomplete and inaccessible.

Business Datasets
When dealing with larger datasets, organizations face difficulties in being able to create, manipulate, and manage big data. Big Data is particularly a problem in business analytics because standard tools and procedures are not designed to search and analyze massive datasets.
As research from Webopedia parent company QuinStreet demonstrates, big data initiatives are poised for explosive growth. QuinStreet surveyed 540 enterprise decision-makers involved in big data and found the datasets of interest to many businesses today include traditional structured databases of inventories, orders, and customer information, as well as unstructured data from the Web, social networking sites, and intelligent devices.

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7 Risks Dropbox Poses to Your Corporate Data – Reason 5 of 7

Why Dropbox Poses Data Risks. Reason 5: Compliance Violations

Bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies and an increasingly mobile workforce are putting new pressures on IT and changing the requirements for how workers want (and need) to access corporate data.

Many compliance policies require that files be held for a specific duration and only be accessed by certain people; in these cases, it is imperative to employ strict control over how long files are kept and who can access them. Since Dropbox has loose (or non-existent) file retention and file access controls, businesses that use Dropbox are risking a compliance violation.

The solution is eDocs.

To learn more contact us today at info@zerofailse.com or 770.396.6000 Option 1.

Tech Terms: Wifi

Wi-Fi is the name of a popular wireless networking technology that uses radio waves to provide wireless high-speed Internet and network connections. A common misconception is that the term Wi-Fi is short for “wireless fidelity,” however this is not the case. Wi-Fi is simply a trademarked phrase that means IEEE 802.11x.

How Wi-Fi Networks Works
Wi-Fi networks have no physical wired connection between sender and receiver by using radio frequency (RF) technology — a frequency within the electromagnetic spectrum associated with radio wave propagation. When an RF current is supplied to an antenna, an electromagnetic field is created that then is able to propagate through space.

The cornerstone of any wireless network is an access point (AP). The primary job of an access point is to broadcast a wireless signal that computers can detect and “tune” into. In order to connect to an access point and join a wireless network, computers and devices must be equipped with wireless network adapters.
The Wi-Fi Alliance
The Wi-Fi Alliance, the organization that owns the Wi-Fi registered trademark term specifically defines Wi-Fi as any “wireless local area network (WLAN) products that are based on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE) 802.11 standards.”

Initially, Wi-Fi was used in place of only the 2.4GHz 802.11b standard, however the Wi-Fi Alliance has expanded the generic use of the Wi-Fi term to include any type of network or WLAN product based on any of the 802.11 standards, including 802.11b, 802.11a, dual-band and so on, in an attempt to stop confusion about wireless LAN interoperability.

Wi-Fi Support in Applications and Devices
Wi-Fi is supported by many applications and devices including video game consoles, home networks, PDAs, mobile phones, major operating systems, and other types of consumer electronics. Any products that are tested and approved as “Wi-Fi Certified” (a registered trademark) by the Wi-Fi Alliance are certified as interoperable with each other, even if they are from different manufacturers. For example, a user with a Wi-Fi Certified product can use any brand of access point with any other brand of client hardware that also is also “Wi-Fi Certified”.

Products that pass this certification are required to carry an identifying seal on their packaging that states “Wi-Fi Certified” and indicates the radio frequency band used (2.5GHz for 802.11b, 802.11g, or 802.11n, and 5GHz for 802.11a).

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Tips & Tricks: macOS QuickType

You know how when you are typing on your iPhone or iPad you can see three suggested words you might be intending to type next? You can get a similar QuickType function on your Mac in certain apps.

If you use TextEdit or Notes, it is possible to hit Esc+Alt while typing a word and see a number of guesses at to which word you might type next.

The list of suggested words will appear and you can select by clicking one of them.
For example, type “hello”, then space, and then hit Alt+Esc (in some cases just Esc), and you will see a list of possible next words.

Tech Terms: CISSP

Certification for Information System Security Professional (CISSP) is a vendor-neutral certification reflecting the qualifications of information security professionals with an objective measurement of competence as well as a globally recognized standard of achievement. CISSP certification means the information security professional demonstrates a working knowledge of information security, confirms commitment to the profession and establishes a standard of best practices.

The Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification is accredited by the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) to ISO (International Organization for Standardization) Standard 17024:2003. The CISSP examination consists of 250 multiple choice questions, covering topics such as Access Control Systems, Cryptography, and Security Management Practices, and is administered by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium or (ISC)2.

CISSP Concentration
With the continuous evolution of information security, (ISC)2 offers concentrated credentials, called CISSP Concentrations. Passing a CISSP Concentration exam demonstrates that the information security professional has proven capabilities and subject-matter expertise beyond what is required for the CISSP credential. These are available in the following areas:

  • Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

The (ISC)2 promotes the CISSP as an aid to evaluating personnel performing information security functions. The certification was first made available in 1989.

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